IN DAYS GONE BY

John Philip Sousa
John Philip Sousa is one of American music’s most well-known figures, primarily for his association with the U.S. Marine Band and with the writing and performing of marches. Young John went to school in Washington, D.C., and also attended a private music conservatory, excelling at the playing of several instruments and preferring the piano and, most of all, the violin. The impressionable Sousa wanted to join a circus band, but his father convinced him to be an apprentice musician in the Marine Band instead, and Sousa was a member of that band until he was 20. He eventually took over as leader of the Marine Band, and his first public performance as leader of the Marine Band was on Sept. 26, 1892.

The First Kennedy-Nixon Debate
On September 26, 1960, the first televised debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon took place. The two presidential candidates would eventually have several debates, but it was this first TV debate that set the tone for the rest of the campaign. In a post-debate interview, most radio listeners thought that Nixon had "won," whereas most TV listeners gave the nod to Kennedy.

COLONIAL AMERICA

Jamestown: First English Colony in America
Explorers had been landing in America for some time before English settlers arrived in what is now Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607. But it was in that spot on the James River that English colonization began and with it, the history of America.

The Pilgrims: Voyage to Freedom
Follow the Pilgrims as they sail across the Atlantic Ocean, from England to America, in search of religious freedom. See who they meet when they land in New England. Find out about the first Thanksgiving.

The 13 American Colonies
This fun, illustrated article describes the 13 American Colonies in detail, from economics to religion to agriculture to revolution. Also includes a clickable map with links to individual descriptions of each colony and a list of the first European settlements in North America. Outstanding resource!

John Peter Zenger and Freedom of the Press
This was the first libel case in America. It forever set the standard for freedom of the press and made a hero of not only Zenger but also his lawyer, Andrew Hamilton.

The Great Awakening
The Great Awakening was a series of religious revivals in the North American British colonies during the 17th and 18th Centuries.


ANCIENT ROME


The Roman civilization was full of famous people, places, and things. One of the giants of the ancient civilizations was Rome: the city, the republic, the empire, and much more.

Among the more well-known ancient Romans were Julius Caesar, Augustus (right), Pompey, Nero, Caligula.

An elaborate slave class powered the might of Rome, and perhaps no slave was more famous than Spartacus, who led a large-scale revolt in the year 73.

Rome had many enemies. Among the most well-known were Hannibal, Atilla the Hun, Alaric the Visigoth, the Etruscans, the Samnites, and the Parthians. It was the Roman legion that won the wars and kept the peace for a great many years. Rome also suffered through years of internal strife.

Roman aqueduct bridge Pantheon Roman road

The Romans were great builders, of roads, aqueducts, baths, and temples. They built a system of laws that formed the basis for many a legal system to follow.


Why Is It?

Why Is It That Jeans Are Blue? Jeans
Jeans are commonplace for many generations of people today–in America, especially, but also in many other countries. Jeans come in many colors these days, but the most common color is the original, blue. Why?

Have a suggestion for this feature? Email Dave.



Significant Sevens are the highest, the lowest, the deepest, the farthest, the oldest, the youngest, and a host of other lists in economics, geography, history, and much more.

Cultural Icons are the instantly recognizable monuments, landforms, buildings, and many other kinds of landmarks that define a people, place, or culture.

 

Search This Site

Custom Search

Get weekly newsletter


 

 

Social Studies for Kids
copyright 2002–2020
David White